NISPA

Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction

Associations between impulsivity, risk behavior and HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis seroprevalence among female prisoners in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study

TitelAssociations between impulsivity, risk behavior and HIV, HBV, HCV and syphilis seroprevalence among female prisoners in Indonesia: A cross-sectional study
PublicatietypeJournal Article
Jaar van publicatie2019
AuteursArends RM, Nelwan EJ, Soediro R, van Crevel R, Alisjahbana B, Pohan HT, A von Borries KL, Schene AH, Van der Ven AJAM, Schellekens AFA
UitgavePLoS One
Volume14
Nummer2
Pagina'se0207970
Publicatiedatum2019
ISSN1932-6203
TrefwoordenCross-Sectional Studies, Female, Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, HIV Infections, Humans, Impulsive Behavior, Indonesia, Prisoners, Risk Factors, Risk-Taking, Seroepidemiologic Studies, Sexual Behavior, Syphilis, Syphilis Serodiagnosis
Samenvatting

HIV, hepatitis B and C, and syphilis share common transmission routes of which primarily unsafe sexual contact and injecting drug use are important. Impulsivity is a major factor contributing to this transmission risk behavior; however comprehensive studies within female, prison, and Asian populations are scarce. This cross-sectional study aims to delineate the contributions of different aspects of impulsivity to risk behavior, among female inmates living in a prison in Jakarta (N = 214). The relationships between various aspects of impulsivity, risk behaviors and seropositivity were tested using analyses of variance and logistic regression analyses. Motor impulsivity was related to alcohol use, reward-related impulsivity to drug use, and cognitive/goal-directed impulsivity to sexual risk behavior. Finally, goal-directed impulsivity was also directly associated with seropositivity. Specific aspects of impulsivity are associated with different types of risk behavior in Indonesian female prisoners, which can be relevant for future studies on infection prevention strategies for such a population.

DOI10.1371/journal.pone.0207970
Alternatieve uitgavePLoS ONE
PubMed ID30768609
PubMed Central IDPMC6377190