NISPA

Nijmegen Institute for Scientist-Practitioners in Addiction

Sleep disturbances are associated with reduced health-related quality of life in patients with substance use disorders.

TitelSleep disturbances are associated with reduced health-related quality of life in patients with substance use disorders.
PublicatietypeJournal Article
Jaar van publicatie2015
AuteursMagnée EHB, van Oene GH de Weert, Wijdeveld TAGM, Coenen AML, DeJong CA
UitgaveAm J Addict
Volume24
Nummer6
Pagina's515-22
Publicatiedatum2015 Sep
ISSN1521-0391
Samenvatting

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Sleep problems and substance use are strongly linked. Sleep problems play a role in the etiology of substance use, but also may be a result of it. After detoxification, sleep problems may worsen leading to relapse. Nowadays, most substance dependence treatment programs aim at recovery rather than total abstinence, and in that view health-related quality of life (HRQL) is a relevant construct. This article describes the association between self-perceived sleep problems and HRQL in a naturalistic population of polydrug-using inpatients.

METHODS: At the start of treatment, 388 polydrug-using inpatients completed questionnaires concerning their sleep quality and HRQL. Three categories were established based on reported sleep problems: patients without sleep problems (21.6%), those with clinically relevant sleep problems (34.5%), and patients with sleep disorders (43.8%).

RESULTS: Mean grades for quality of sleep were M = 7.3 (sd 1.7), M = 6.6 (sd 1.7) and M = 5.3 (sd 1.9) for the three categories, respectively. In addition, patients in the disorder category perceived a lower HRQL than those in the other categories. In the explanation of HRQL, both sleep problems and sleep disorders added significantly to the model when controlling for baseline characteristics.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Our findings stress the need for clinicians to pay attention to the quality of sleep of recovering polydrug users, since this may play an important role in the recovery process. Monitoring sleep during treatment is advocated. This study adds to the knowledge about the way HRQL and sleep are related in a naturalistic sample of substance-dependent patients. (Am J Addict 2015;24:515-522).

DOI10.1111/ajad.12243
Alternatieve uitgaveAm J Addict
PubMed ID26073849